Theory

Development and Public Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

Using case studies drawn largely but not exclusively from Sub-Saharan Africa, this course explores the challenges and complexities of delivering health in under-resourced settings. Over the past sixty years, various development models and policies have been applied locally and globally. We will critically examine the theory and practice that underlies what has become ‘global health’ within an evolving development framework.

Program Evaluation for Community Development and Social Change

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This research methods course provides students with intensive knowledge of the theory and practice of program evaluation research with an emphasis on its practical relevance for local community development organizations, national and international agencies, funders from the public, private, third sectors, and other policymakers.

Introducation to International Community Development

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

The field of community development seeks to increase well-being among vulnerable populations and to guide governments and civil society toward humane, equitable and environmentally sound programs and policies that contribute to freedom from poverty, gender equality, access to education and livelihood opportunities and overall sustainable human development.

The course is taught by Dr. Reut Barak Weekes

Strategic Approaches to Social Innovation

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Social entrepreneurship is a growing field of practice and of academic research. The course will discuss the differences between social and commercial entrepreneurship. Furthermore, it will grapple with the challenge of increasing social value utilizing theories of innovation that were developed in the commercial sector.

The course is taught by Dr. Jonathan Mirvis

The International Dimension of Development

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

This course focuses on several major topics regarding economic development and the position of developing countries in the contemporary trading system. The course addresses the principal dimensions and measurement of "underdevelopment", principal theories of development (i.e., why some countries managed to become "developed" while the other remained underdeveloped?), the basic principles of the GATT/WTO system, the WTO special rules regarding trade with developing countries.

Development Economics: Principles and Application

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

What allows countries to develop? What holds development and growth in certain regions? Why many developing countries in Africa have seen lower levels of growth and development in recent               decades than Asians states? This course examines these questions and many others by discussing various models in development economics and exploring their application in reality. 

Globalization and Organizations by Prof. Gili Drori

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

The course reviews both issues - globalization and organizations – while focusing on those topics that link between the two. It discusses how organizations serve as the carriers of globalization processes: how, while expanding their activities worldwide, organizations proliferate social procedures, establish isomorphic structures, and diffuse cultural patterns. The course also reviews how, on the other hand, globalization processes encourage the formation of organizations and determine their shape worldwide.

Ethics of International Organizations by Dr. Gad Prudovsky

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

Actions performed in the public sphere raise many ethical issues. They always involve intervention in the regular course of things; and quite often the intervention has major effects on people's lives. The international arena is even more complex. Issues of legitimacy, which are at the national level quite settled, are hotly debated at the international level. Therefore, the main focus of the course – over and above the ordinary issues of public ethics – will be on an examination of this issue of legitimacy.