Classes

Development and Global Health: A Critical Approach to Theory, Policy and Practice

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Using case studies drawn largely but not exclusively from Sub-Saharan Africa, this course explores the challenges and complexities of delivering health in under-resourced settings. Over the past sixty years, various development models and policies have been applied locally and globally. We will critically examine the theory and practice that underlies what has become ‘global health’ within an evolving development framework.

Development in conflict zones: theoretical exploration and practical tools

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Lecture    (a)    2nd Semester    Tuesday    09/06/20    08:30-12:15     
Lecture    (a)    2nd Semester    Tuesday    23/06/20    08:30-12:15     
Lecture    (a)    2nd Semester    Tuesday    26/05/20    08:30-12:15     
Comments: 
Course will be given in English. One credit for online portion of the course during the second semester, one credit for 3 4-hour sessions held over May and June. 

This class will be taught by Ms. Rina Kedem

Research Methods for Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

The main purpose of this course is to teach student to understand the basics steps in the research process. We begin with an explanation of research design so that students can see how a research question may be answered. Once the framework for research is established the students will learn some basic statistics for describing variables and the relationships between variables.

Gender and International Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Gender and development constitutes its own academic sub-field and has proven to be an enduring international policy and planning focus since the 1970s. With this in mind, the foundational questions that underlie this course are: 
• Why should the issue of gender constitute a legitimate planning tradition in its own right? 
• Why do the proliferating numbers of policies and plans for action in gender and development often fail to be implemented? 
• How do transnational relationships shape trends in gender and development? 

Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Social entrepreneurship is a growing field of practice and of academic research. The course will discuss the differences between social and commercial entrepreneurship. Furthermore, it will grapple with the challenge of increasing social value utilizing theories of innovation that were developed in the commercial sector.

The course is taught by Dr. Jonathan Mirvis

International Development in Practice: Approaches, Challenges and Skills

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

The course is practice oriented. It links local development approaches (Assets Based Community Development - ABCD, Results Based Accountability - RBA, The Leaky Bucket concept within the framework of Local Sustainable Economic Development - LSED, The Triple Helix Approach for innovation) to project design methodology and implementation through identifying a small scale development project with a selected organization relevant to developing countries' realities, and implementing at least a component of the project during the semester.

Annual Program Seminar

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2019

The Glocal Seminar is an annual, compulsory seminar. It will consist of six-seven meetings each semester. The first semester will be devoted to the theme related to International Development. Some of the sessions will be conducted by guest lecturers: we will meet activists in the realm of development who will share some of their dilemmas, as well as scholars who are engaged in research into these issues.

Annual Pre-Internship Course: First steps for professionalism in the field

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2019

This is a practical course (taught in two parts) designed to guide students in creating and preparing for their internship. The first section of the course (first semester), takes the format of a workshop, and is held every other week. The workshop's role is to prepare students for choosing their placements and applying for their internships.

Humanitarianism

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

There is much talk of the ‘relief to development’ continuum in the aid world, and about the need to create clusters of agencies to work together in providing more coherent responses to the needs of populations. However, there are underlying tensions associated with relief and development which continually arise, not least because relief is shaped by an ideology, humanitarianism, which, in essence, requires development to fail. Humanitarianism is a powerful, pervasive and resilient set of ideas associated with saving strangers.

Postcolonial Theory

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Post-colonial theory explores the impact of European colonization upon the societies which it subjugated, recognizing that the cultural and political struggles which colonization set in motion continue to influence the present. Central concerns relate to the impact of European languages, institutions and epistemologies on colonized societies. The foundational gesture of postcolonialism consisted in uncovering the link between Western knowledge systems, exemplified in discourses such as Said’s “Orientalism,” and the maintenance of colonial power.

Gender and Feminism – Theory and Practice

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

The course will introduce feminist theories from the global South and North, and explore the role of gender in social, cultural and economic processes. We will consider gendered social constructions, and the relationship between ideology and disenfranchising practices in everyday lives. The course will begin with an introduction to the field of gender, sexuality and feminist thought, following we will examine matrixes of oppression in the South and gender and globalization. 

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