Cohort 7 (2016-2017)

Development and Global Health: A Critical Approach to Theory, Policy and Practice

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

Using case studies drawn largely but not exclusively from Sub-Saharan Africa, this course explores the challenges and complexities of delivering health in under-resourced settings. Over the past sixty years, various development models and policies have been applied locally and globally. We will critically examine the theory and practice that underlies what has become ‘global health’ within an evolving development framework.

Gender and International Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Gender and development constitutes its own academic sub-field and has proven to be an enduring international policy and planning focus since the 1970s. With this in mind, the foundational questions that underlie this course are: 
• Why should the issue of gender constitute a legitimate planning tradition in its own right? 
• Why do the proliferating numbers of policies and plans for action in gender and development often fail to be implemented? 
• How do transnational relationships shape trends in gender and development? 

Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Social entrepreneurship is a growing field of practice and of academic research. The course will discuss the differences between social and commercial entrepreneurship. Furthermore, it will grapple with the challenge of increasing social value utilizing theories of innovation that were developed in the commercial sector.

The course is taught by Dr. Jonathan Mirvis

Annual Program Seminar

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2019

The Glocal Seminar is an annual, compulsory seminar. It will consist of six-seven meetings each semester. The first semester will be devoted to the theme related to International Development. Some of the sessions will be conducted by guest lecturers: we will meet activists in the realm of development who will share some of their dilemmas, as well as scholars who are engaged in research into these issues.

Annual Pre-Internship Course: First steps for professionalism in the field

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2019

This is a practical course (taught in two parts) designed to guide students in creating and preparing for their internship. The first section of the course (first semester), takes the format of a workshop, and is held every other week. The workshop's role is to prepare students for choosing their placements and applying for their internships.

Qualitative Research Methods

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

This course explores how qualitative research—characterized as inductive, non-statistical, interpretive and exploratory—constitutes social science research. It walks students through the steps of academic research with a qualitative focus: How to identify a robust research question, choose an appropriate data collection method and research design, address research bias, gain first-hand experience applying methods during a unique, two-day, off-campus research practicum, and finally, transform field data into academic text through preliminary analysis.

Program Evaluation for Community Development and Social Change

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

This research methods course provides students with intensive knowledge of the theory and practice of program evaluation research with an emphasis on its practical relevance for local community development organizations, national and international agencies, funders from the public, private, third sectors, and other policymakers.

Development Economics: Principles and Application

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

What allows countries to develop? What holds development and growth in certain regions? Why many developing countries in Africa have seen lower levels of growth and development in recent               decades than Asians states? This course examines these questions and many others by discussing various models in development economics and exploring their application in reality. 

Population change: Why it matters?

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2017

The course focuses on the two-way relationship between major demographic events and societal transitions. Demographic events include epidemics, large-scale migration, and more recently, the dramatic reductions in fertility and mortality. Societal transitions include those related to religious belief and practice, political instability, economic development, as well as to those associated with the "second demographic transition" in contemporary low fertility countries.

The International Dimension of Development

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

This course focuses on several major topics regarding economic development and the position of developing countries in the contemporary trading system. The course addresses the principal dimensions and measurement of "underdevelopment", principal theories of development (i.e., why some countries managed to become "developed" while the other remained underdeveloped?), the basic principles of the GATT/WTO system, the WTO special rules regarding trade with developing countries.