Orit Gazit

Dr. Orit Gazit

Lecturer
Dr. Orit Gazit

Dr. Orit Gazit is a lecturer in the GLOCAL program. She teaches the mandatory course in “community development” and the course “refugees and development”. She holds a PhD in sociology and international relations, as well as a law degree (LL.B), from the Hebrew University, and currently teaches in the departments of sociology and international relations at the Hebrew University. She was previously a Rothschild (Yad Hanadiv) and Nazarian post-doctoral fellow in UCLA, and a fellow in the Martin Buber Society of Fellows (MBSF) in the humanities and social sciences. Her fields of research include international migration and refugees; international political sociology (IPS); territorial passages and border crossing; space and spatiality in world politics; and sociological and international relations theory. She has published ethnographic studies on the identity of the Lebanese Maronites (Tzadal) who fled from Lebanon to Israel in the year 2000; on Latin American political exiles; and on Ethiopian immigrants in Israel. She has also researched and written about citizenship tests for immigrants in Western countries (with Oded Lowenheim), and co-edited the volume Collective Identities, States and Globalization: Exploring the Legacy of SN Eisenstadt (with Gad Yair). Her recent publications examine the interrelations between migration, border crossing and emotions through classical social thought: A Simmelian Approach to Space in World Politics (2017) applies Georg Simmel’s classical sociology of space, and particularly his conceptions of empty space, boundaries and mobility, to contemporary international politics; and The Magico-religious Facets of the Territorial Passage: Van Gennep, Ontological (In)security and the German Refugee Crisis (2017) approaches the contemporary concept of ontological security (OS) in migration through Arnold van Gennep’s forgotten 1909 theory of territorial passages, utilizing this theory to analyze the German societal response to the 2015 refugee crisis. Her most recent work (2018) applies the concept of epistemic trust (ET) in migration to the field of security studies.